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The metric unit for temperature measurement, Celsius is named for the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701 1744) who introduced a similar scale in 1742, several years before his death.

The system that he devoloped did divide the distance between waters freezing and boiling points into 100 parts, however the freezing point was marked at 100 and boiling at 0. In otherwords it was backwards compared to the one we know now.

The Celsius system in use today has the freezing point marked at 0 and the boiling point at 100 and was created by Christin of Lyons (1707 – 1778), in 1743.

To figure out Celsius from the following scales, use the corresponding formula


Delisle
[°C] = 100 − [°De] · 2/3
Fahrenheit
[°C] = ([°F] − 32) · 5/9
Kelvin
[°C] = [K] − 273.15
Newton
[°C] = [°N] · 100/33
Rankine
[°C] = ([°Ra] − 491.67) · 5/9
Réaumur
[°C] = [°Ré] · 5/4
Rømer
[°C] = ([°Rø] − 7.5) · 40/21

Legend

[°C] = Celsius

[°De] = Delisle

[°F] = Fahrenheit

[°K] = Kelvin

[°N] = Newton

[°R] = Rankine

[°Ré] = Réaumur

[°Rø] = Rømer


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