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Fahrenheit is the standard scale for non-scientific use in measuring temperature in the United States. It gets it's name from the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (16861736) who invented the mercury thermometer and created the scale in 1724.

Each point on the scale is 5⁄9 the size of a Celsius degree. In Fahrenheit, 32°F degrees represents the freezing point of water and 212°F the boiling point. The human body is measured at 98.6 °F.

Fahrenheit was the chief standard for weather, science and medical use in the majority of English speaking countries until the late 1960s and early 70s when governments, trying to standardize according to the metric system switched over to Celsius.

To figure out Fahrenheit from the following scales, use the corresponding formula


Celsius
[°F] = [°C] · 9/5 + 32
Delisle
[°F] = 212 − [°De] · 6/5
Kelvin
[°F] = [K] · 9/5 − 459.67
Newton
[°F] = [°N] · 60/11 + 32
Rankine
[°F] = [°Ra] − 459.67
Réaumur
[°F] = [°Ré] · 9/4 + 32
Rømer
[°F] = ([°Rø] − 7.5) · 24/7 + 32

Legend

[°C] = Celsius

[°De] = Delisle

[°F] = Fahrenheit

[°K] = Kelvin

[°N] = Newton

[°R] = Rankine

[°Ré] = Réaumur

[°Rø] = Rømer


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